The all stainless steel, WESMAR V2-12 hydraulically driven bow thruster system on board the 17 meter (60 foot) Search and Rescue (SAR) vessel built for the U.S. Navy Office of Foreign Military by Willard Marine provides an enormous amount of capability to maneuver in close quarters and hold steady to position during critical Search and Rescue missions, including safe evacuations and tight maneuvering.

 

The WESMAR bow thruster ensures station keeping for safe evacuations and tight maneuvering during fire fighting, offshore patrol and offshore escort duties.

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Two highly sophisticated fireboats,  located on the US east are equipped with WESMAR bow thrusters. The ‘City of Portland’ and the ‘American United.’  The 65-foot City of Portland was the first of the two fireboats delivered, and it was followed by the 79-foot American United. Each was designed by another leading maritime company, Canada’s prestigious Robert Allan Ltd., Naval Architectural firm, founded in Vancouver BC in 1930. 

The ‘City of Portland’ has a 40 HP WESMAR V2-12 hydraulic stainless steel counter rotating dual prop bow thruster system and the American United has a 75 HP electric stainless steel V2-18 dual prop counter rotating system. 

 The City of Portland is stationed in downtown Portland, Maine, operating both as a Fire and Marine Ambulance, traveling to the outer Islands where she must work in and out of small bays and channels.

The 79-foot  American United is a Ranger Class fireboat  and is in service at Logan Airport as part of the Massachusetts  Port Authority.  She is named in memory of the passengers and crew of American Airlines Flight 11 and United Airlines Flight 175 . The boat is used for emergency response, search and rescue operations, and firefighting. She includes 30 life rafts, two 3,000-gallon-per-minute pumps for fighting fires, and a foam injection system, to facilitate rescue of aircraft crash survivors plus a FLIR thermal imaging system and ample flood lighting for nighttime operation.

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